Singles and Doubles #functionaldrumming
Inspiration from James Altucher

Threes and Fours #functionaldrumming

Today we’ll apply this same idea to groups of 3 and 4 notes.

Again the goal for these exercises is for them to help you develop your singles and doubles in a variety of combinations.  My hope is that you’ll find these helpful as you continue to develop your technique on the snare drum and drum set.

Threes:

  1. Starting off we begin with RRR followed by LLL.  Be sure to accent the first note of the group and to let the following notes bounce, so that all three notes happen with one wrist motion.

  1. Next add your left hand between each R to stopping on the last right, to create a single stroke 5.  By stopping on the last R, we are able to then begin with our L and doing the same  - we add our right hand in between each L stopping on the last left, to create a single stroke 5 starting with our left hand.  

  1. And finally, we’ll now double each individual note (except for the last one) to create a 9 stroke roll starting with our R and then with our L.

It’s much easier to show you this via video and print (or in person!) so hopefully the accompanying image and videos below will help to make this idea more clear.

 

 

3 and 4s Functional Drumming

Fours:

  1. Starting off we begin with RRRR followed by LLLL.  Be sure to accent the first note of the group and to let the following notes bounce, so that all four notes happen with one wrist motion.

  1. Next add your left hand between each R to stopping on the last right, to create a single stroke 7.  By stopping on the last R, we are able to then begin with our L and doing the same  - we add our right hand inbetween each L stopping on the last left, to create a single stroke 7 starting with our left hand.  

  1. And finally, we’ll now double each individual note (except for the last one) to create a 13 stroke roll starting with our R and then with our L.

 

And though it might be useful to know that we are “creating” rudiments with these exercises, I prefer not to get hung up on what rudiment I’m doing and rather focus on the group of notes that I’m playing.  So as you play, think about the groups - is it a combination of 3 notes, or 4 note?  I find that by thinking in groups of 2’s, 3’s, and 4’s, I find that these exercises find their way into my playing more often than when I’m thinking of them only as specific rudiments.

A note about my term: “Functional Drumming” My approach to this series is to strip drumming technique down to the bare essentials, and build up from there. And so without having to know rudiments, or studying from a prescribed book (that will come later!), one can naturally discover simple combinations and patterns that will help develop basic technique with a natural logical flow.